Antivirus and Security

Anti-Virus - free updatable software

Internet safety - keeping yourself safe

Security & Insurance - keeping your equipment safe


Anti-Virus

Readers at Tyndale have access to free anti-virus software with continuous automatic updates while they are here, thanks to Cambridge University.

Download your free copy for PC or Mac.
It is strongly advised that all users install antivirus software.
Instructions are there, but some short instructions are below.
While you are at Tyndale you will have access to free updates.


When you leave Tyndale, or if you are leaving soon, you can get other free antivirus software :
AVG for PC,  AVAST for PC, or Sophos for Mac
These are free for personal use, with free updates.

For added privacy you may want Anti-Spyware such as Spydot Search & Destroy ,
If you already have anti-virus software, such as Norton, please make sure you get regular updates, or your software is useless.

SETTING UP YOUR ANTI-VIRUS SOFTWARE ON A PC

Go to the web page http://www.ucs.cam.ac.uk/support/anti-virus
Click on VirusScan and save the Ent Setup file to your desktop  (you can Trash it later)
- disconnect from the Internet, and uninstall Norton or other anti-virus software
- Double-click on the Ent Setup file and click OK to install and setup.
- While it is installing abox remains open which tells you what to do next.
-The box will close when it is finished but it may take a very long time!
- When they box closes, find the blue McAfee shield on the task bar, right-click and choose Update Now.
- Restart the computer to finish activating it.

You can change the settings using the icon in the bottom right of the screen
- though the default setting work fine in most circumstances.
- the original setup file can not go in the Trash


FIREWALL SOFTWARE

PC users should also use a Firewall which prevents people from connecting to your computer using scanning software. This is becoming an increasingly realistic risk for anyone who has their computer permanently connected to the Internet (as yours is, if you are networked at to the Internet through Tyndale House). PCs are much more vulnerable than Macs (as usual).

The Windows Firewall works very well. ZoneAlarm and Norton Firewall need configuration because they stop the network traffic.

 

 

 

 


Internet safety

Golden Rules:

1) NEVER LEFT-CLICK ON ATTACHMENTS

2) NEVER CLICK ON WEB LINKS IN AN EMAIL

3) DON'T USE THE SAME PASSWORD FOR EVERYTHING

But what do I do with attachments if I can't click on them?

Attachments may look like pictures or Word documents, but they can be virus programs in disguise. So force them to open in the program you want:

EITHER Right-click and use "Open with..." (if your email program has this option)
and click on Word or whichever program to want to view it with.

OR Drag the attachment to the Word icon or the Word title bar

 

The web-link takes me to my normal online account. What's the harm?

A web link can hide a redirection to an identical-looking bank site which asks
you to 'confirm' details, and then uses them to steal your identity.

EITHER Make a Favorite or Bookmark for your real online bank site

OR Type in the address. Eg type "PayPal" and press Ctrl-Enter (IE types the rest)

 

How am I supposed to remember lots of different passwords?

If you register for a freebie or make a small purchase on the web,
your ID & password can be tried out in all the online money sites to find your account.

EITHER Use three passwords, for non-secure, semi-secure and very-secure uses.

OR Keep a record of IDs and Passwords in boring looking place and don't label them "passwords".

 

Can't I just rely on my anti-virus program?

Anti-Virus software is only as good as the last update,
and a new virus propagates around the planet in just a few hours.

Also, viruses can't protect us from our own stupidity.

Nevertheless, you MUST install and use anti-Virus software,and keep it up to date,
for the sake of other people who are on your email list, if not for yourself.


Security & Insurance

The books in the library are insured (as much as a unique collection can be), as well as staff computers, but individually owned books and computers etc are NOT insured and are the responsibility of the owner. This is a relatively crime-free area, but security is unfortunately necessary, so please close self-locking doors after you have gone through.